Gardening Times

AT this time of the year gardens are full of colour and fragrance, mostly from spring flowering bulbs.

Loading Comments
Share
Print

Although the daffodils are fading there are many different varieties of tulip and hyacinth to take over.

Early morning is the time of day when you get the best from the heavily-scented hyacinths.

Some people find the scent overpowering, but the fantastic colours are unbeatable.

Tulips are also giving fantastic displays just now with combinations of mono-colour, bi-colour and frilly edged flowers.

There are new varieties of bulbs released each year as growers vie for perfection, optimum flower colour, shape and size.

Once the flowers begin to fade a lot of people start to think about what to do with the bulbs, as they will be being replaced with summer-flowering plants.

The answer depends on where the bulbs have been planted and what type of storage space you have available.

If you want to keep them for next year it is important to allow the energy and goodness of this seasons growth to be absorbed back into the bulb, the flower's food store.

The methods of doing so is the same for most bulbs.

Most gardeners plant bulbs in flower beds, borders or containers for them to become part of the planting scheme along with spring flowering plants.

This means that when you are emptying the beds and containers to re-plant for the coming season you have the choice of keeping the bulbs for next year or putting them on the compost heap. To keep them for planting next year you have to dry them out in order to store them.

You need a fair bit of space in a frost free area, whether it's a shed, garage or potting shed.

If you have a vented shelving unit or rack you should lay the bulbs out with a bit of space between them which allows them to die back letting the goodness go back into the bulb without rotting.

If you don't have much space you could loosely tie the bulbs in bunches and hang them.

Be warned though, no matter how well you dry out and store this year's bulbs there is always the chance that next season you will not get the same amount of flowers - sometimes only foliage re-appears. It depends how strong the original bulb was and if it was from good stock.

Home and Garden

Commenting & Moderation

We moderate all comments on Evening Times on either a pre-moderated or post-moderated basis. If you're a relatively new user then your comments will be reviewed before publication and if we know you well and trust you then your comments will be subject to moderation only if other users or the moderators believe you've broken the rules

Moderation is undertaken full-time 9am-6pm on weekdays, and on a part-time basis outwith those hours. Please be patient if your posts are not approved instantly.

161874

Have you got a story?

Contact the news desk on 0141 302 6520 or email news@eveningtimes.co.uk
Games news:

Putting the world to rights

Gail's Gab

Wish you were here reader, I’m lapping up with sun with me in my bikini and Tommy in his 1980s style trunks

Times Out

Entertainment

Lifestyle

TV Advert
Cat’s Eyes on Glasgow

Cat’s Eyes on Glasgow

Cat Cubie’s job is to find and share with you the fabulous things the city has to offer, from gigs to gastro.

Janice Bell

Janice Bell

You Couldn't Make This Up

Ah the Glassgow banter, you just canne beat it.

Michelle McManus

Michelle McManus

Columnist Michelle McManus is Sussed in the City, and loves to chat about anything and everything.