A CATHOLIC chaplain of a Glasgow university has held a service to atone for the "gross offence" of Pride Glasgow.

Father Mark Morris, of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, last night invited parishioners to a rosary of reparation.

According the Balornock church's website, the service was a "Rosary of reparation for the gross offence to God which is Pride Glasgow."

Saturday's Pride march was led by First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who called the event “celebrating and reaffirming the values of tolerance, diversity, equality, love and respect.”

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But last night Father Morris, who is the Catholic chaplain of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU), held a service offering decades of the Rosary, Litany and Benediction in reparation for the LGBTQI+ event.

Jordan Daly, Co-Founder of Time for Inclusive Education (TIE), which campaigns for inclusive education in schools, said it was "sad and disappointing" to see Father Morris's "condemnation" of the event.

Evening Times:

He said: "The Pride parade was, as always, a vibrant and colourful display of diversity, acceptance, and inclusivity.

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"The ethos of the parade is equality and love, so it is sad and disappointing to see that Father Morris has countered those fundamental values by holding this service and allowing a narrative of exclusion and condemnation to enter the mainstream as a result."

Father Morris celebrates Mass on Thursdays in the Faith and Belief Centre in the university's William Harley Building, and hears confession.

A spokesman for the Catholic Church in Glasgow said: “This was a private parish devotion unrelated to Father Morris’s role as chaplain.”

A spokesman for the university said GCU is fully inclusive.

He said: “The university is strongly inclusive.

"We respect and promote equality and diversity.

"This includes an official presence at the last two Pride Glasgow events.”

But Jordan added: "We are concerned about the message that this could send to the young people of Glasgow Caledonian University, and so would like to stress that these predictable voices of opposition are becoming increasingly drowned out by a Catholic and wider faith community which is supportive of LGBT equality.

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"There were many people of faith who attended the Parade this weekend and in our efforts to advance LGBT-inclusive education in schools, we have been strongly supported by numerous Catholic Priests and their parishioners, as well as Church of Scotland and Scottish Episcopal Church ministers.

"Our experience working with the Scottish Catholic Education Service as part of the Scottish Government's LGBT Inclusive Education Working Group has also been nothing but positive and productive.

"We know that those who support the LGBT community outweigh those who endorse intolerance and I imagine that the number of attendees to this service in contrast with those who attended the Pride parade would further prove that."

NUS Scotland's LGBT+ Officer Kai O’Doherty added: “NUS Scotland is proud to be at the forefront of breaking down barriers facing LGBT+ people. 

"Universities should be a place where every student, regardless of religion, sexuality, or identity, feels accepted and supported to study without fear of discrimination.

“Everybody within our university communities has a duty to ensure that campuses are compatible with the accepting and progressive culture that they strive to achieve. 

"We’re proud of the progress that has been made, but every day we are reminded of how far we still have to go to achieve a truly inclusive society.”

Following Ms Sturgeon's involvement in Pride, a Scottish Government spokesman said: “Scotland is considered to be one of the most progressive countries in Europe regarding LGBTI equality, and Pride Glasgow is a fantastic event that brings communities together and celebrates all that LGBTI people contribute to Scottish life.

“As a society we must champion equality and fairness at all times and defend the progress that has been made.”