by Tristan Stewart-Robertson

EVEN with 34 grandchildren and 37 great-grandchildren, somehow Davie Bunton could remember everyone he met and ask how they were doing.

Far more than his direct family would call him “Da” or “Father” or “Granda” after decades in Drumchapel and even longer as a fan of Celtic FC where he was their oldest season ticket holder.

Born David Anthony Bunton on October 24, 1919, he was the eldest of six children growing up in the east end of Glasgow.

He joined the TA at 15, then the Army and was called up to World War II at 20, serving as a Sapper with 1 Field Squadron Royal Engineers in France, the Middle East, North Africa and north west Europe.

When the war ended, he returned home decorated with eight medals, including the prestigious Military Medal. He was awarded the Légion d’Honneur from the French government - but it only arrived two days after his passing.

Evening Times:

Davie married Elizabeth Brannan (Betty) in 1944 and they had started their family in the south side. In 1955 they moved to a new home in Camus Place, Drumchapel, extending their family to 13 children - Rena, Jean, Ellen, David, Joseph, John, Anne, Tony, Peter, Thomas, Liz, Sandy and Angela.

After working as a factory foreman and transport manager in Dalmarnock, Davie retired and he and Betty ran an ice cream stall at Camus Place Centre followed by a sweet shop.

Then he became a lollipop man at St Pius Primary until his second retirement at 70.

Davies faith was hugely important to him and he attended mass every week and even when he went on holiday he would seek out the nearest chapel as soon as he arrived.

Granddaughter Claire Hardie told our sister title the Clydebank Post: “He was dedicated to his family and friends - he always remembered people’s names and their family and asked about them as well.

“Without fail, he never missed anybody’s birthday, with a card and a hand-written line.”

Evening Times:
Davie Bunton loved to laugh

Davie was still living at home, at 97, right until the end. In the weeks after he presented the SPL trophy to Celtic in May, he started to feel a bit ill and was then diagnosed with liver cancer in July.

But he continued to live at home until just before he passed away in September with his family looking after him and the help of Macmillan and Marie Curie nurses.

Claire said he always credited his long life to porridge, Guinness, whisky and Celtic - but only the porridge was daily.

Last year he visited Normandy with a group of fellow veterans to mark the D-Day anniversary and was amazed at the hospitality and love he found towards them.

She said: “Right up to the final day he was still laughing and joking with people - he was just his normal and happy self, sharp as a tack.

“I’m 40 so he was a huge part of my life. I went to his house for lunch every day when I was going to school.

“He always took an interest in grandchildren and tried his best to attend what they were doing. He was still travelling up to six years ago and went to Celtic away matches as much as he could.

Evening Times:
Davie, fourth right, visited Normandy in 2016 with other veterans

“Celtic was in his life. He just ended up going with his dad when he was young - and he just regularly went as long as he could. Every memory he had related to Celtic and a lot of our family still go.”

When Davie was 95, he asked family members to donated to St Margaret of Scotland Hospice, who had cared for his dad, raising £975. He would then collect 5p coins and taken down £40-50 every month to the charity.

The family thanked Alex Black Funeral Care for their fantastic efforts, Olivers in Drumchapel, who hosted the reception, and Celtic FC for their support, including his picture and message on the big screens during the recent Paris Saint-Germain game.

They also expressed thanks for all the flowers, donations to St Margaret’s and messages of condolence from so many members of the community.

Davie Bunton, leaves behind six sons and six daughters, 34 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren, four great-great-grandchildren and another two on the way.