It's no exaggeration to say that poor air quality is a matter of life and death

Before any major event, there are always controversies.

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But with two weeks until the Commonwealth Games commence we'll soon be past the point of grumbling about the planning, and onto enjoying the Games themselves.

Indeed it's hard to remember now just how contentious so many elements of the 2012 London Olympics were. From the paranoid brand protection - would someone wearing a Pepsi T-shirt be barred entry to events? - to the G4S security scandal, the weeks and months preceding the Games were rife with controversy.

Of course, within about 20 minutes of Danny Boyle's spectacular opening ceremony much of that was forgotten, and I expect the same will be true of Glasgow this summer. But it's important that the Games are subject to proper scrutiny.

One of the core components of the Glasgow bid was a set of green pledges. Among these was a commitment to create Low Emission Zones around many of the city venues.

This would have been a breakthrough not just for Glasgow, but for Scotland. While Low Emission Zones have already been established in England and throughout Europe, Scotland has yet to take the plunge. So it was with real dismay that I learned that this promise has been dumped.

I know that environmental commitments don't come at the top of everyone's priorities. But it is no exaggeration to say that Glasgow's poor air quality is a matter of life and death.

According to Friends of the Earth, Glasgow's air pollution is the cause of over 300 deaths every year in the city, as well undermining quality of life for all of us. Low emission zones would have been a welcome step towards tackling this problem. I'll certainly be pressing Glasgow City Council and the Scottish Government to recapture the lost ambition on tackling air pollution.

On a more positive note, the Games have already provided one happy development; Pride House.

Building on success at previous sporting events, Pride House will provide a welcoming venue for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender athletes and supporters, and anyone else who wants to know more about the challenges and positive developments in LGBT sport, as well as the urgent issue of LGBT human rights abuses across the Commonwealth.

Scotland has a positive story to tell about LGBT human rights. In the space of a few decades, we have moved from a situation where homosexuality was still illegal, to recent legislation to allow same-sex marriage.

While there is still more to be done, and we must not be complacent, Scotland's story can serve as an example of how quickly laws and attitudes can change. Pride House will offer a great platform to share that story.

Learn more about Pride House at http://pridehouseglasgow.co.uk/

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